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Posts for: January, 2019

By One Dental Care - Kunio Chan, DMD, MAGD
January 28, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: topical fluoride  
TopicalFluorideisaSafeWaytoProtectYourChildsTeethfromDecay

We've known for decades that fluoride strengthens tooth enamel and lowers the risk for decay. And while adding it to toothpaste and drinking water are the more common ways for getting it into the body, an increasingly popular way—especially for children—is to apply fluoride directly to the teeth.

But is topical fluoride really worth the effort and expense? And, are there any side effects to treating teeth this way?

As to the first question, researchers have performed numerous studies measuring fluoride's effectiveness for preventing tooth decay. The Cochrane Oral Health Research Group recently reviewed studies on topical fluoride applications involving nearly 10,000 children and adolescents between the ages of 2 and 15. The combined average for all the studies showed a 28% reduction in decayed teeth for patients who received topical fluoride compared to those who didn't.

This was especially true for children at high risk for decay: directly applying fluoride gels, foams or varnishes to teeth reduces that risk substantially. But there are also side effects to this application. Fluoride in general has only one known safety concern, a condition known as fluorosis. Too much fluoride over time can cause heavy discoloration of the teeth. This does not affect the health of the teeth, but it can look unattractive and require cosmetic treatment to reduce its effect.

There's little to no risk for fluorosis with the controlled treatments offered by dentists; the fluoride solution remains on the teeth no more than a few minutes. But there is a possible side effect during treatment due to the relatively high dose of fluoride used. If the patient accidentally swallows some of the solution, the concentration of fluoride can cause stomach upset, vomiting or headaches.

Dentists minimize the chances for this by usually using the more difficult to swallow varnish form of topical fluoride on younger patients, and using trays or other barrier devices to isolate the fluoride solution from the rest of the mouth. Under professional supervision, it's rare for an accidental ingestion to occur.

The risks for these side effects are quite low, and the benefits of topical fluoride for reducing the chances for decay can more than outweigh them. Fluoride applications are one of many ways we can protect your child's current and future dental health.

If you would like more information on decay prevention techniques like topical fluoride, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Fluoride Gels Reduce Decay.”


By One Dental Care - Kunio Chan, DMD, MAGD
January 18, 2019
Category: Oral Health
FlossingDailyAroundImplantswillHelpPreventLosingYourBridge

Implant-supported fixed bridges are growing in popularity because they offer superior support to traditional bridges or dentures. They can also improve bone health thanks to the affinity between bone cells and the implants' titanium posts.

Even so, you'll still need to stay alert to the threat of periodontal (gum) disease. This bacterial infection usually triggered by dental plaque could ultimately infect the underlying bone and cause it to deteriorate. As a result the implants could loosen and cause you to lose your bridgework.

To avoid this you'll need to be as diligent with removing plaque from around your implants as you would with natural teeth. The best means for doing this is to floss around each implant post between the bridgework and the natural gums.

This type of flossing is quite different than with natural teeth where you work the floss in between each tooth. With your bridgework you'll need to thread the floss between it and the gums with the help of a floss threader, a small handheld device with a loop on one end and a stiff flat edge on the other.

To use it you'll first pull off about 18" of dental floss and thread it through the loop. You'll then gently work the sharper end between the gums and bridge from the cheek side toward the tongue. Once through to the tongue side, you'll hold one end of the floss and pull the floss threader away with the other until the floss is now underneath the bridge.

You'll then loop each end of the floss around your fingers on each hand and work the floss up and down the sides of the nearest tooth or implant. You'll then release one hand from the floss and pull the floss out from beneath the bridge. Rethread it in the threader and move to the next section of the bridge and clean those implants.

You can also use other methods like specialized floss with stiffened ends for threading, an oral irrigator (or "water flosser") that emits a pressurized spray of water to loosen plaque, or an interproximal brush that can reach into narrow spaces. If you choose an interproximal brush, however, be sure it's not made with metal wire, which can scratch the implant and create microscopic crevices for plaque.

Use the method you and your dentist think best to keep your implants plaque-free. Doing so will help reduce your risk of a gum infection that could endanger your implant-supported bridgework.

If you would like more information on implant-supported bridges, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Oral Hygiene for Fixed Bridgework.”


By One Dental Care - Kunio Chan, DMD, MAGD
January 08, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: crown lengthening  
CrownLengtheningMightbeNecessaryforSeniorswithToothDecay

While tooth decay is a potential problem at any age, the risk increases as you grow older. Not only are senior adults more susceptible, decay is often more difficult to treat. That’s because cavities can occur at or below the gum line, often due to gum recession.

If that’s the case, we won’t be able to fill the cavity in the usual way because the gum tissue is in the way. To make it possible to treat, we may need to perform a minor surgical procedure known as crown lengthening.

As the name implies, the procedure helps expose more of the crown, the tooth’s visible part, from the surrounding gum tissue. In basic terms, we’re repositioning the gum tissue away from the biting surface of a tooth to make room for a filling. It’s also useful for improving a tooth’s appearance by making it look longer, or creating room for a crown or other dental restoration.

After applying a local anesthesia, the dentist (or periodontist, a specialist in the gums) creates a tiny flap of gum tissue with a series of incisions. This allows the dentist to move the affected gums out of the way to access the underlying bone. The dentist then reshapes the bone to adequately support the gum tissue when it’s finally repositioned to expose the crown. In its new and improved position, the dentist sutures the gum tissue in place.

For a few days afterward, the patient will need to restrict their diet to soft foods, avoid strenuous activities and apply an ice pack to help reduce swelling the day of surgery. They will also prescribe a pain reliever and possibly an antibiotic to reduce the chances of infection.

While most people return to normal activities a few days later, you’ll usually have to wait a few weeks for the gums to heal before undergoing any further treatments for the affected teeth. But even with the wait, crown lengthening could make it possible to not only save your tooth but improve your smile as well.

If you would like more information on treating tooth decay, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Crown Lengthening: This Common Surgical Procedure Restores Function and Improves Appearance.”


By One Dental Care - Kunio Chan, DMD, MAGD
January 02, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: Family Dentist  

Family DentistFor busy individuals, getting to the dentist for preventive care can be difficult. On the other hand, getting the entire family to the dentist can seem next to impossible when you factor in conflicting schedules and differing dental care needs. A family dentist offers the ideal answer for busy families by providing services to patients of all ages in a single practice. For those in Billerica, MA, Dr. Kunio Chan of One Dental Care offers this solution—read on to learn more!

Your Family Dentistry in Billerica, MA

There are a number of advantages to using a single dentist for the entire family. For instance, because a family dentist offers a broad range of preventive, restorative, and cosmetic dentistry services for patients of all ages in a single practice, families can save both time and money by scheduling preventive, routine treatments like check-ups and dental cleanups at times that work for the whole family. This collective care ensures that everyone keeps up with their oral health, preventing dental issues from turning into larger, more expensive problems.

Another advantage of a family dentist is a superior level of familiarity in the doctor/patient relationship. This personability can formulate amiable relationships which can help instill lifelong oral health and hygiene habits in children, as well as ease the dental anxiety and phobias that prevent tens of millions of Americans from getting the preventive care and treatment that they need every year. Furthermore, working with a family dentist keeps the entire family's dental records and history in one place, which can make it easier to monitor the progression and treatment of hereditary conditions that could potentially affect multiple members of the same family.

What is the Difference Between a Family Dentist and a General Dentist?

Family dentists are trained to treat patients of all ages, from children to geriatric patients, so unlike other dentists with similar training and credentials who only treat patients within a certain age range, family dentists provide services for everyone, including both babies whose first teeth have just erupted as well as senior citizens who are dealing with periodontal disease and tooth loss.

Interested? Call our Billerica Office Today!

For more information about preventive care and the benefits of having one dentist for the whole family, contact One Dental Care by calling (978) 667-0691 to schedule an appointment with Dr. Chan today.